THE POST-TRAUMATIC GROWTH OF ATO COMBATANTS IN THE CONTEXT OF THEIR SOCIAL ADAPTATION

DOI: https://doi.org/10.31435/rsglobal_sr/01062018/5630

Melnik O. V.

Ukraine, Cherkassy, Cherkassy regional hospital for war combatants

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Abstract.

This study aims to investigate the relationship of expression of symptoms of PTSD with post-traumatic growth. The concepts of resiliency, hardiness, posttraumatic growth of participants in combat operations are analyzed. It was established that Antiterrorist Operation personnel’s experience the action of a number of strong stressors, which are accompanied by stress factors directly in the area of hostilities. At the same time, hardiness is a potentially projective factor that provides participants of ATO of all ages from traumatic disorders. According to the results of the study, it was found that a high level of hardiness is characteristic for all participants of the ATO, regardless of age, and posttraumatic growth is always expressed more in the presence of a traumatic event, that is, with PTSD.

Keywords: trauma, social adaptation, PTSD, posttraumatic growth, resiliency

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